Citation link: http://dx.doi.org/10.25819/ubsi/9885
DC FieldValueLanguage
crisitem.author.orcid0000-0002-1837-3898-
dc.contributor.authorEwert, Benjamin-
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-19T12:28:20Z-
dc.date.available2021-03-19T12:28:20Z-
dc.date.issued2019de
dc.descriptionFinanziert aus dem DFG-geförderten Open-Access-Publikationsfonds der Universität Siegen für Zeitschriftenartikelde
dc.description.abstractBehavioural interventions are much more than ‘just another policy tool’. Indeed, the use of behavioural science has the potential to lead to a wide-ranging reassessment of policymaking and public administration. However, Behavioural Public Policy remains a policy paradigm ‘under construction’. This paper seeks to contribute to this development process by investigating the conceptual features of advanced Behavioural Public Policy that go beyond the now familiar notion of nudging individual behavioural change. It thus seeks to provide more illumination in a debate which currently seems to have become stuck on the pro and cons of nudging citizens’ individual behaviours. In reality, Behavioural Public Policy should be seen as a pluralist, non-deterministic and multipurpose approach that allows the application of behavioural insights ‘throughout the policy process’ and in combination with regulatory policies. The paper’s line of argument unfolds in three steps. First, it explores the policy rationales that have driven nudge techniques and also summarises the conceptual, methodological, ethical and ideological criticisms that have made of it. In a second step, state-of-the-art Behavioural Public Policy, which claims to be more substantial and wide-ranging than today’s nudge techniques, is empirically examined through interviews conducted with global thinkers (academics and practitioners) in the field of behavioural insights. Finally, there is a discussion of whether advanced Behavioural Public Policy could be better suited to withstand the criticisms that have been directed at nudge techniques.en
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25819/ubsi/9885-
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.ub.uni-siegen.de/handle/ubsi/1877-
dc.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:hbz:467-18779-
dc.language.isoende
dc.sourcePublic Policy and Administration 2020, Vol. 35, Issue 3, S. 337-360. - https://doi.org/10.1177/0952076719889090de
dc.subject.ddc320 Politikde
dc.subject.otherBehavioural insightsen
dc.subject.otherBehavioural public policyen
dc.subject.otherExpert interwiewsen
dc.subject.otherNudgeen
dc.subject.otherPolicy makingen
dc.subject.otherPolicy processen
dc.subject.swbStaatstätigkeitde
dc.subject.swbNudgede
dc.subject.swbVerhaltensökonomiede
dc.subject.swbExperteninterviewde
dc.titleMoving beyond the obsession with nudging individual behaviour: towards a broader understanding of behavioural public policyen
dc.typeArticlede
item.fulltextWith Fulltext-
ubsi.publication.affiliationSeminar für Sozialwissenschaftende
ubsi.source.authorSAGE Publicationsde
ubsi.source.issn1749-4192-
ubsi.source.issued2020de
ubsi.source.issuenumber3de
ubsi.source.linkhttps://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/homede
ubsi.source.pagefrom337de
ubsi.source.pageto360de
ubsi.source.placeThousand Oaksde
ubsi.source.publisherSAGE Publicationsde
ubsi.source.titlePublic Policy and Administrationde
ubsi.source.volume35de
ubsi.subject.ghbsPDHde
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